Google Fi service versus T-Mobile and Nexus 6 real-world camera performance?

Google has launched Project Fi. I’m trying to figure out how this is different from T-Mobile.

  • Google: $ 40/month per line for talking, texting, and consuming 2 GB of mobile data from the T-Mobile or Sprint network. If you’re traveling to most countries you pay 20 cents/minute to make or receive a phone call. Wi-Fi calling when mobile coverage is weak.
  • T-Mobile family plan with four lines: $ 25/month per line for talking, texting, and consuming 2.5 GB of mobile data from the T-Mobile network. If you’re traveling to most countries you pay 20 cents/minute to make or receive a phone call. Wi-Fi calling when mobile coverage is weak. Unlimited music streaming in addition to your data allowance.

Why isn’t doing business directly with T-Mobile a better deal, assuming that you need a few lines and/or can get a few friends together?

For those who are photographically-inclined, e.g., parents of children aged 0-12, another potentially huge advantage of T-Mobile is that one can use an iPhone 6+ with its awesome-in-practice camera system (good hardware; great software). DxOMark gives the Nexus 6 poor marks for autofocus performance, implying that this is a good camera when glued to a tripod in the studio but very likely near-worthless for real-world photography of moving children. (iPhone 6+, by contrast, gets a good review for autofocus)

Anyone out there with a Nexus 6 care to comment on the camera’s real-world capabilities?

If the Nexus 6 is as crummy a camera in practice as DxOMark’s test implies and Fi costs more per line than T-Mobile, what practical case can be made for the Project Fi service? For a consumer with at least three friends or family members and a little interest in taking pictures wouldn’t it nearly always make more sense to get an iPhone 6 or 6+ and T-Mobile service?

Related:

Philip Greenspun’s Weblog

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